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Customers line up at the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The meals are in to-go containers because the POD’s primary customers are flightline personnel who do not have a lot of time and need hot meals.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, places salads at the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The meals are in to-go containers because the POD’s primary customers are flightline personnel who do not have a lot of time and need hot meals.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, places hot meals under heat lamps at the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The meals are in to-go containers because the POD’s primary customers are flightline personnel who do not have a lot of time and need hot meals.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, places hot meals in boxes for transportation to the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The DFAC prepares breakfast, lunch and dinner for the POD every Monday through Friday and Unit Training Assembly weekends.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, tears the price tags for to-go containers for the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The meals are in to-go containers because the POD’s primary customers are flightline personnel who do not have a lot of time and need hot meals.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, writes the contents of the meal on to-go containers for the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The meals are in to-go containers because the POD’s primary customers are flightline personnel who do not have a lot of time and need hot meals.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, writes the contents of the meal on to-go containers for the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The meals are in to-go containers because the POD’s primary customers are flightline personnel who do not have a lot of time and need hot meals.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, serves corn in to-go containers for the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The DFAC prepares breakfast, lunch and dinner for the POD every Monday through Friday and Unit Training Assembly weekends.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, serves corn in to-go containers for the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The DFAC prepares breakfast, lunch and dinner for the POD every Monday through Friday and Unit Training Assembly weekends.
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Rodel Magno, 673d Force Support Squadron Iditarod Dining Facility cook, serves lasagna in to-go containers for the Provisions on Demand at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, April 25, 2017. The DFAC prepares breakfast, lunch and dinner for the POD every Monday through Friday and Unit Training Assembly weekends.
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Wilkes Island, one of three islands that make up Wake Atoll, is home to a bird sanctuary of approximately 40,000 birds and 12 species. The U.S. Air Force, through partnerships with agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have worked in recent years to restore Wake Atoll to a more natural habit for its bird population and rid the three islands of invasive plant species. Wake Atoll, made up of the tropical islands of Wilkes, Wake and Peale, is located approximately 2,138 nautical miles west of Honolulu, has a population of roughly 100 residents including Air Force personnel and American and Thai contractors, and is managed by the Pacific Air Forces Regional Support Center under 11th Air Force at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.
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John “Bird Man” Gilardi (left), a restoration ecologist, and Mashuri Waite, an ecologist, spray herbicide into the bark of an invasive ironwood tree April 12, 2017 at Wake Atoll. Gilardi and Waite are working to eradicate the invasive tree species. The trees, native to Australia and Indonesia among other regions, create forests where most plants won’t grow. This makes for a habitat that is not conducive to the natural open air environment preferred by the native birds of the atoll. The U.S. Air Force, through partnerships with agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have worked in recent years to restore Wake Atoll to a more natural habit for its bird population and rid the three islands of invasive plant species. Wake Atoll, made up of the tropical islands of Wilkes, Wake and Peale, is located approximately 2,138 nautical miles west of Honolulu, has a population of roughly 100 residents including Air Force personnel and American and Thai contractors, and is managed by the Pacific Air Forces Regional Support Center under 11th Air Force at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.
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Birds fly and nest in the bird sanctuary on Wilkes Island at Wake Atoll April 11, 2017. The sanctuary has approximately 40,000 birds and 12 species on an island less than one square mile in size. The U.S. Air Force, through partnerships with agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have worked in recent years to restore Wake Atoll to a more natural habit for its bird population and rid the three islands of invasive plant species. Wake Atoll, made up of the tropical islands of Wilkes, Wake and Peale, is located approximately 2,138 nautical miles west of Honolulu, has a population of roughly 100 residents including Air Force personnel and American and Thai contractors, and is managed by the Pacific Air Forces Regional Support Center under 11th Air Force at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.
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A Masked Booby sits on its nest in the bird sanctuary of Wilkes Island at Wake Atoll April 11, 2017. The island is home to a bird sanctuary of approximately 40,000 birds and 12 species. The U.S. Air Force, through partnerships with agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have worked in recent years to restore Wake Atoll to a more natural habit for its bird population and rid the three islands of invasive plant species. Wake Atoll, made up of the tropical islands of Wilkes, Wake and Peale, is located approximately 2,138 nautical miles west of Honolulu, has a population of roughly 100 residents including Air Force personnel and American and Thai contractors, and is managed by the Pacific Air Forces Regional Support Center under 11th Air Force at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.
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A shark swims off the coast of Wake Atoll, part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Pacific Remote Island Marine National Monument. The marine monument reaches 200 nautical miles off the coast lines of the atoll. The first 12 nautical miles of ocean is a refuge within the monument. The U.S. Air Force, through partnerships with agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have worked in recent years to restore Wake Atoll to a more natural habit both on and off shore. Wake Atoll, made up of the tropical islands of Wilkes, Wake and Peale, is located approximately 2,138 nautical miles west of Honolulu, has a population of roughly 100 residents including Air Force personnel and American and Thai contractors, and is managed by the Pacific Air Forces Regional Support Center under 11th Air Force at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.
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U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Dominic Schulte, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 flight equipment technician from Miramar, Calif., closes the cockpit of an FA-18C Hornet from his squadron at the flight line at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, for Exercise Northern Edge, April 24, 2017. Various military aircraft from all services will practice operations, techniques and procedures while enhancing interoperability during Northern Edge 2017 – Alaska’s premier joint-training exercise.
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