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RadarRadar
Radar

On the way back from the Indian Mountain long-range radar site, the C-12 passes over the Alaska Mountain Range. The highest mountain in the range is Mt. McKinley which comes up to 20,322 feet at its highest point. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
Radar


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Posted: 7/31/2015

RadarRadar
Radar

Indian Mountain long-range radar site personnel take Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson visitors to their cabin on the mountain they often use to weather storms. At the radar site, recreation is limited, so the cabin is a popular place to relax. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
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Posted: 7/31/2015

RadarRadar
Radar

Indian Mountain long-range radar site personnel take Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson visitors to their cabin on the mountain they often use to weather storms. At the radar site, recreation is limited, so the cabin is a popular place to relax. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
Radar


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Posted: 7/31/2015

RadarRadar
Radar

The Indian Mountain long-range radar site is one of many such sites whose mission is to track aircraft in Alaska's airspace and along Alaska's borders for unauthorized aircraft. These sites are critical to the ongoing defense of American airspace. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
Radar


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Posted: 7/31/2015

RadarRadar
Radar

The Indian Mountain long-range radar site is one of many such sites whose mission is to track aircraft in Alaska's airspace and along Alaska's borders for unauthorized aircraft. These sites are critical to the ongoing defense of American airspace. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
Radar


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Posted: 7/31/2015

RadarRadar
Radar

Visiting personnel from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska place hearing protection in before being escorted into the inner-workings of the Indian Mountain long-range radar site's infrastructure as part of a tour July 21. The radar site monitors Alaskan airspace for unauthorized aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st class Kyle Johnson)
Radar


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Posted: 7/31/2015

RadarRadar
Radar

The Indian Mountain long-range radar site is one of many such sites whose mission is to track aircraft in Alaska's airspace and along Alaska's borders for unauthorized aircraft. These sites are critical to the ongoing defense of American airspace. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
Radar


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Posted: 7/31/2015

RadarRadar
Radar

Col. Brian Bruckbauer, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson and 673d Air Base Wing commander, and Lt. Col. Larry Corzine, Pacific Air Forces Regional Support Center deputy commander, follow Lt. Col. Blake Johnson, 517th Squadron commander and pilot for the trip, onto the C-12, 517th Airlift Squadron designated to take them from JBER, Alaska, to Indian Mountain long-range radar site July 21. These radar sites track aircraft in American airspace to ensure unauthorized aircraft are not allowed in. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
Radar


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Posted: 7/31/2015

Building BarriersBuilding Barriers
Building Barriers

The steel cable an aircraft's tailhook would grab in the event of an emergency is held slightly more than two inches off the ground, in part, by rubber donuts and is one part of the BAK-12 aircraft arresting system. The BAK-12s on the flightline of Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson are designed to bring out-of-control aircraft to a safe stop with minimal damage. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
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Posted: 6/23/2015

Building BarriersBuilding Barriers
Building Barriers

The steel cable an aircraft's tailhook would grab in the event of an emergency is held slightly more than two inches off the ground, in part, by rubber donuts and is one part of the BAK-12 aircraft arresting system. The donuts in the center of the runway are spray-painted so a pilot can more easily hook the center of the cable in the event of an emergency. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
Building ...


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Posted: 6/23/2015

Building BarriersBuilding Barriers
Building Barriers

The steel cable an aircraft's tailhook would grab in the event of an emergency sits slightly more than two inches off the ground and is one part of the BAK-12 aircraft arresting system. The BAK-12s on the flightline of Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson are designed to bring out-of-control aircraft to a safe stop with minimal damage. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
Building ...


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Posted: 6/23/2015

Building BarriersBuilding Barriers
Building Barriers

The BAK-12 aircraft arresting system is powered by two 3.6-liter, 65-horsepower diesel engines, one on each side of runway. The BAK-12s on the flightline of Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson are designed to bring out-of-control aircraft to a safe stop with minimal damage. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Kyle Johnson)
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Posted: 6/23/2015

    

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